Global Valve and Controls
29May/17Off

Working in the oil and gas industry

While its true the oil industry has its ups and downs it is also true that working in the oil and gas industry has its perks no matter what role you partake in. The world of oil and gas is all about tapping into the world’s resources, and there will always be a need for people to do this, whether it’s for sustainable energy or using the current methods. Technology is constantly expanding, so you’ll always be learning new things.

Working in the O&G industry is not all about lifting heavy machines, knowing how to use different types of machinery or even digging holes in the ground, well yes there are those types of jobs but if you are 8-5 Monday through Friday type of person, then there are tons of office jobs that will suit your needs. And those who are more interested in mixing chemicals and seeing their reactions, there are also lab jobs.

The O&G industry must always be on top of their game when it comes to technology so if you have those awesome computer skills jobs are always opening up in your field. With todays hacks it is very crucial for a company to stay on top of technology. For example, a pipeline company that has a pipeline that transports oil from one Point A to Point B  gets compromised, then its bad news for everyone not just the pipeline company.

Although tons of jobs require you to have a 3 year or more degree there are also tons of jobs that are looking for a person they can teach and grow within the company. For example, many on site jobs do not require a degree but someone with a willingness to learn.

Demand for oil is all over the globe, so there is always the job that requires a applicant to travel which could be a very interesting perk. Many employers provide excellent training for their staff because they want to keep their talent. A lot of employers will also offer other perks such as bonus schemes, good pension plans, private healthcare and dental care, childcare support and more. A good point to remember is that when you first start off you don’t have to go straight to the biggest company.  You can work your way up through smaller companies so you can gain the best experience possible. As the oil and gas sector starts to develop even more, these smaller companies will grow with the sector and be extremely valuable places to work.

Working with machinery dealing with various valves does take special skill and knowledge

https://engineering-jobs.theiet.org/article/8-reasons-why-you-should-work-in-the-oil-and-gas-sector/

5Apr/17Off

Will the Solar Power industry take over the Petrochemical industry?

After oil sky rocketed down around the world, a new technology emerged in Norway which focuses primarily on offshore solar power. When oil started going down in 2014, many engineers lost their jobs and are still looking for work in the O&G industry. The downturn brought, Øyvind Christian Rohn ideas on how to create a new renewable source, even possibly create more jobs than the O&G industry supplies. He created the idea of having offshore solar power technology.  The idea is to have the "technology that will have solar farms that can float on the ocean surface, with their power transmitted back to land. Since physical space is limited in population centres, especially in areas of high growth such as South East Asia, its idea is to use the ocean’s surface around the world."

In Norway, The petrochemical industry is still hierarchy but according to Rohn, "It is becoming the long-term solution for the world because it is abundant energy and costs have gone down rapidly." The solar industry is still very new technology and is currently being used at 1% but the idea is growing very fast. In fact, the municipal county in Oslo is offering households a subsidy of 30% of the investment to install solar panels in their homes.

Cost is not the only thing that many people factor in the challenge is that they have grown up with the idea of having the O&G sector. People have worked in the industry, thus has become part of their culture. The main challenge would be to switch to green energy.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2017/mar/28/oil-and-gas-norways-fossil-free-energy-renewables-oslo?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

13Mar/17Off

A world without drilling

Are we ready to stop drilling?

What would happen if all the drilling for oil and gas stopped all over the world? Is that even possible? It is very hard to imagine as we have well over 700,000 oil wells! I found this fascinating as there is already a plan put in place in the UK, called NEST or National Employment Savings Trust, recently announced it was moving 10 percent of its investments toward firms that work to reduce climate change and create more environmentally-friendly methods of energy use. NEST will be focusing more on renewable energy such as solar and wind and less on extracting energy which is a sign of climate change. It sounds a bit dramatic to stop all the drilling all of a sudden but further research shows there might be something that both sides can agree on.

The method is to find a plan which is not as expensive and reduces pollution. Washington State University researchers recently published findings indicating they have found a better method of conducting a significant catalytic reaction frequently used in the oil and gas industries. If it’s widely adopted, the energy savings and reduced pollutants could be impressive. Their method is to place a small amount of carbon within the catalyst that breaks apart the carbon and hydrogen in methane. The increased amount causes the creation of nickel carbide. One of the researchers at WSU also noted that the current process is very wasteful and that converting methane without the burn that produces gas would benefit energy providers and the environment. A win-win for both sides!

It is very hard to tell if the new process will affect the global market and how it will affect as businesses have not yet started using this new method of extracting oil.

To read more information about this new method, please visit this website: http://www.theenergycollective.com/mnichols/2400104/new-research-help-save-oil-gas-money-environment

Valves such as our GVC BV6000 is a an example of a valve that can be used in oil wells for drilling. http://gvcintl.com/products_threaded_and_socket_weld_valves.html

 

 

13Feb/17Off

Aberdeens first oil and gas technology center opens up

Great news for Scotland, as a new technology center will open up in Aberdeen. The area has been long over due for a new facility as there is untapped oil in the North sea. "The research and development hub will help create new technology for the North Sea and back innovative projects." the centers first task will be to cut the cost of drilling wells to at least half as well as the maintenance that comes along with it. It will also find a way to drill where oil is available and has been untouched. It is estimated that about 20 billion barrels of oil and gas can be taken from the North sea. This will also boost the economy as it once the center opens up, they will be hiring hundreds of employees.  The technology center will focus on making the UK continental shelf more economical and support the decommissioning center as in the past companies would just abandon the active wells.

 

https://stv.tv/news/north/1380369-new-180m-oil-and-gas-technology-centre-opens-in-aberdeen/

23Jan/17Off

IT makes a difference in our industry

It doesn’t matter if you are working with pipelines, rigs, valves or the person sitting behind the desk doing all the paperwork. The backbone of the company, the industry, that makes the company run is the IT people sitting behind the desk (some in the field), making everything work. IT in the industry has always been a big part of the company, but now than ever their work is more recognizable. Industries now consider, “digitalization as a way for companies, large and small, to work smarter and do more with less.” Few examples are;

More oil and gas industries are now all using the slogan, “Work smarter with less,” especially ever since the downturn of oil, companies had to look for new ways to grow their business without hurting. Many upstream companies are using smart sensor technology which collects larger amounts of data.

“The unpredictability of the market has meant that industry has reduced spending on large-scale maintenance and the modification of assets the longer a company delays asset maintenance, the more potentially hazardous it becomes from a safety, environmental and operational standpoint.” The IT crew jumps in to implement quickly which means there is quicker time to value especially the big projects.

New technology to extract resources. When all the layoffs began, it was hard for a company to continue working on the big projects, as they could not afford to lose people, but also could not afford to pay anyone. IT has created new technology that allows companies to have less people although continuing to work. This is where the slogan, “work smarter with less,” comes in.

2017 is presenting oil and gas companies with new challenges as the industry moves further into uncharted waters. Organizations must balance budget cuts and reduced headcounts with increasing pressure to realize value faster than ever before, and exploit new opportunities.” This is where the IT people are making a difference in the world.

GVCINTL 16" ANSI 2500 Automated the IT has a strong influence in automation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.energyvoice.com/opinion/128176/opinion-four-trends-fuelling-oil-gas-industry-2017/

16Jan/17Off

Is offshore drilling good or bad?

Oil drilling has been criticized from the very beginning. Talk of how it is bad for the environment and the health of nearby towns is ongoing. We keep reading all the negative sides, but the positive information is never published. There is talk of offshore drilling, but it is very controversial and no one can decide if it’s bad or good. What is the difference between offshore and onshore drilling? Offshore drilling happens thousands of feet underwater, with that said you can pretty much figure out what onshore drilling consists of.

What is the negative side of offshore drilling? “Whenever oil is recovered from the ocean floor, other chemicals and toxic substances come up too -- things like mercury, lead and arsenic that are often released back into the ocean. In addition, seismic waves used to locate oil can harm sea mammals and disorient whales.” However, did you know that technology has made this process safer than what it used to be? From 1975 to today, offshore drilling has had a 99.999% safety record.

“Believe it or not, more oil actually spills into U.S. waters from natural sources and municipal and industrial waste than it does than from offshore oil and gas drilling.”

On a positive note, since we have started drilling offshore, we are less dependable on other countries such as the Middle east to provide oil and petroleum for the rest of the country. This stabilizes our economy more than ever. Another good thing about offshore drilling is that it created hundreds of jobs for those who do not have any. Especially when oil prices hit a low and thousands were laid off, this is a big deal. Offshore drilling plays a big part in the turnaround in our economy.

GVCINTL API 6D Valves ready to go!

 

http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/offshore-drilling-controversy2.htm

15Jan/17Off

The expansion of pipelines

The year 2016 was a very busy year for those who work in the pipeline business. There were at least 14 new pipeline projects in 24 different states. “Encouraged by the Obama administration’s shelving of the Keystone XL Pipeline and its revoked authorization for construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline on federal lands, activists are now eyeing new battles”. If passed, the projects together will total almost 2.5 million miles of pipelines in the U.S alone. People who are for the pipeline projects argue that not only will the pipelines will provide thousands of jobs, but as a whole are safer for oil transport than rail or truck. Those who oppose the pipeline projects say that, “while pipelines are, statistically, far safer than trucks or trains, those that fail the consequences can be catastrophic.”

One project located in Pennsylvania, the Marcellus Shale will expand the pipeline currently existing creating roughly 2500 new jobs. “The Marcellus provides more than 36% of the shale gas produced in the U.S.”

While the Obama administration has put a stop to the Dakota Access Pipeline, it has permitted two pipelines linking the Permian Basin in Texas with customers in Mexico.”  With so many ongoing pipeline projects, could there be a overflow of pipelines?

GVCINTL API 6D Valves in ground

http://www.ecowatch.com/fracking-pipeline-projects-2011302077.html

10Jan/17Off

Time for a change?

The O&G industry has been making people rich for years by providing millions of jobs, and giving opportunity to invest their money in the stock market up until the oil market went down. Thousands of people are still employed but the number is not in the millions anymore. Because of the changes that many companies in the industry had to take the last two years a big question arises, is it time to turn in the keys and retire? Retirement is the number one question that many people are asking themselves after working in the O&G industry. How does one even think about this as the next step? Those who are fortunate are given a special “envelope” in which is enclosed a special bonus just for leaving, unfortunately there are many people out there that don’t get anything.

The “Great Crew Change” is upon us now. This means, “the looming retirement of thousands of older workers--has companies trying to plug the gap by training younger employees.” Younger, less experienced employees mean more money for the companies, and less for the employees. To retire and move on has to be a tough decision to make as there are many people who are not given the choice, but how do you know when it is your turn?

 

http://www.rigzone.com/news/oil_gas/a/147987/Three_Things_to_Consider_Before_Retiring_from_Oil_Gas

27Dec/16Off

Abandoned oil wells cause a concern

        Driving from Bartlesville Oklahoma to Tulsa most of what I saw were oil wells on each side of the road, almost a mile apart sometimes more. Like Oklahoma, Texas is filled with oil wells as well, some parts of the state have more than others. The wells you see around town are not always active, there are quite a few wells actually that are abandoned.  These “inactive” oil wells that are abandoned are a huge concern for citizens nearby as, “fluids can gurgle and leak, migrating where they don’t belong. In some rare instances, land could even sink or collapse” The majority of these holes in the ground aka wells are spread out through West Texas, and have been there for over a century ago. Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana are among three of the top states with the most abandoned oil wells.

                It is interesting because Texas specifically has over 300,000.00 wells that “are currently pumping oil, gas dollars into the economy, and this does not include some 1.5 million oil wells that were dug up but came up dry”.  After the wells come up dry, operators simply plug them up as not to cause any harm to the environment, but there are many holes that are dug up dry and simply abandoned due to not having enough funds to plug them up or the company has gone bankrupt which is a big deal. “The Railroad Commission will take action on any well to plug or repair it, when there is evidence that is has been an abandoned oil or gas well, the problem is that if the well has been transferred over by use by a private landowner than the RC no longer has permission to plug or repair it.” With no one wanting to take the responsibility or pitch their voices, this is the biggest concern. Abandoned wells can threaten groundwater which pollutes the aquifers for drinking water.

 

http://www.mrt.com/business/oil/article/Abandoned-Texas-oil-wells-seen-as-ticking-time-10813938.php

21Dec/16Off

The Midstream business today

The year 2014 was when the oil prices took a hit and continued to go downhill till earlier this year. Although, still not as high as where they once were, oil prices are slowly starting to rise and are predicted to be back where they were if not close by 2020. But what happened to everyone working in all the energy sectors; The upstream, midstream and downstream, did they too take a hit? We know that many companies had big layoffs such as ConocoPhillips, Chevron and many more not to mention bankruptcies, but where do they stand today?

In the upstream energy sector analysts have said that their activity has been stalled due to the falling oil prices and unfortunately layoffs were uncontrollable and downstream, has fared fairly well in regard to hiring, partly due to an inflated candidate pool of skilled professionals who have been laid off because of low oil prices.

What about the midstream energy sector? According to energy experts, the midstream sector had to lay off hundreds of employees too especially when oil prices were under $30 per barrel. “there’s been a little bit of negative effect, but not to the extent that you see in the E&P [exploration and production] and services space” Even though the midstream sector has been affected by the low prices, it has actually done quite well in comparison to the upstream and downstream sectors. In fact, many midstream companies are out looking for skilled workers.

Valves such as these Thru Conduit Gate Valves and Trunnion Ball Valves are used in pipelines around the world

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.rigzone.com/news/oil_gas/a/143734/Midstream_A_Silver_Lining_in_Oil_Gas_Downturn