Global Valve and Controls
23Jan/17Off

IT makes a difference in our industry

It doesn’t matter if you are working with pipelines, rigs, valves or the person sitting behind the desk doing all the paperwork. The backbone of the company, the industry, that makes the company run is the IT people sitting behind the desk (some in the field), making everything work. IT in the industry has always been a big part of the company, but now than ever their work is more recognizable. Industries now consider, “digitalization as a way for companies, large and small, to work smarter and do more with less.” Few examples are;

More oil and gas industries are now all using the slogan, “Work smarter with less,” especially ever since the downturn of oil, companies had to look for new ways to grow their business without hurting. Many upstream companies are using smart sensor technology which collects larger amounts of data.

“The unpredictability of the market has meant that industry has reduced spending on large-scale maintenance and the modification of assets the longer a company delays asset maintenance, the more potentially hazardous it becomes from a safety, environmental and operational standpoint.” The IT crew jumps in to implement quickly which means there is quicker time to value especially the big projects.

New technology to extract resources. When all the layoffs began, it was hard for a company to continue working on the big projects, as they could not afford to lose people, but also could not afford to pay anyone. IT has created new technology that allows companies to have less people although continuing to work. This is where the slogan, “work smarter with less,” comes in.

2017 is presenting oil and gas companies with new challenges as the industry moves further into uncharted waters. Organizations must balance budget cuts and reduced headcounts with increasing pressure to realize value faster than ever before, and exploit new opportunities.” This is where the IT people are making a difference in the world.

GVCINTL 16" ANSI 2500 Automated the IT has a strong influence in automation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.energyvoice.com/opinion/128176/opinion-four-trends-fuelling-oil-gas-industry-2017/

16Jan/17Off

Is offshore drilling good or bad?

Oil drilling has been criticized from the very beginning. Talk of how it is bad for the environment and the health of nearby towns is ongoing. We keep reading all the negative sides, but the positive information is never published. There is talk of offshore drilling, but it is very controversial and no one can decide if it’s bad or good. What is the difference between offshore and onshore drilling? Offshore drilling happens thousands of feet underwater, with that said you can pretty much figure out what onshore drilling consists of.

What is the negative side of offshore drilling? “Whenever oil is recovered from the ocean floor, other chemicals and toxic substances come up too -- things like mercury, lead and arsenic that are often released back into the ocean. In addition, seismic waves used to locate oil can harm sea mammals and disorient whales.” However, did you know that technology has made this process safer than what it used to be? From 1975 to today, offshore drilling has had a 99.999% safety record.

“Believe it or not, more oil actually spills into U.S. waters from natural sources and municipal and industrial waste than it does than from offshore oil and gas drilling.”

On a positive note, since we have started drilling offshore, we are less dependable on other countries such as the Middle east to provide oil and petroleum for the rest of the country. This stabilizes our economy more than ever. Another good thing about offshore drilling is that it created hundreds of jobs for those who do not have any. Especially when oil prices hit a low and thousands were laid off, this is a big deal. Offshore drilling plays a big part in the turnaround in our economy.

GVCINTL API 6D Valves ready to go!

 

http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/offshore-drilling-controversy2.htm

15Jan/17Off

The expansion of pipelines

The year 2016 was a very busy year for those who work in the pipeline business. There were at least 14 new pipeline projects in 24 different states. “Encouraged by the Obama administration’s shelving of the Keystone XL Pipeline and its revoked authorization for construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline on federal lands, activists are now eyeing new battles”. If passed, the projects together will total almost 2.5 million miles of pipelines in the U.S alone. People who are for the pipeline projects argue that not only will the pipelines will provide thousands of jobs, but as a whole are safer for oil transport than rail or truck. Those who oppose the pipeline projects say that, “while pipelines are, statistically, far safer than trucks or trains, those that fail the consequences can be catastrophic.”

One project located in Pennsylvania, the Marcellus Shale will expand the pipeline currently existing creating roughly 2500 new jobs. “The Marcellus provides more than 36% of the shale gas produced in the U.S.”

While the Obama administration has put a stop to the Dakota Access Pipeline, it has permitted two pipelines linking the Permian Basin in Texas with customers in Mexico.”  With so many ongoing pipeline projects, could there be a overflow of pipelines?

GVCINTL API 6D Valves in ground

http://www.ecowatch.com/fracking-pipeline-projects-2011302077.html

10Jan/17Off

Time for a change?

The O&G industry has been making people rich for years by providing millions of jobs, and giving opportunity to invest their money in the stock market up until the oil market went down. Thousands of people are still employed but the number is not in the millions anymore. Because of the changes that many companies in the industry had to take the last two years a big question arises, is it time to turn in the keys and retire? Retirement is the number one question that many people are asking themselves after working in the O&G industry. How does one even think about this as the next step? Those who are fortunate are given a special “envelope” in which is enclosed a special bonus just for leaving, unfortunately there are many people out there that don’t get anything.

The “Great Crew Change” is upon us now. This means, “the looming retirement of thousands of older workers--has companies trying to plug the gap by training younger employees.” Younger, less experienced employees mean more money for the companies, and less for the employees. To retire and move on has to be a tough decision to make as there are many people who are not given the choice, but how do you know when it is your turn?

 

http://www.rigzone.com/news/oil_gas/a/147987/Three_Things_to_Consider_Before_Retiring_from_Oil_Gas