Tag Archives: Ball Valves Houston

Gearbox installation on a Trunnion Ball Valve

Gearbox installation on a Trunnion Ball Valve

Installing a gear box on a Trunnion ball valve is no easy task. In fact, if you want to learn be ready to get your hands messy. It is recommended to buy some gloves that are suitable to wear for the lubrication process. Remember to always consult the manufacturer first.

Start by generously lubricating the stem of the valve. We use an industrial high-performance grease that works with the same temperature ratings as our valve.

Apply grease to the stem, stem key, and dowel pin and insert the stem key into the stem slot. The dowel pin will be inserted through the stem key and into the stem to hold the stem key in place within the stem slot.

Apply the grease to four (4) of the bolts and insert them into the mounting pad in the holes closest to the end flanges. This is necessary due to having less clearance to insert these four (4) bolts after the gear is installed due to the curvature of the valve body.

Once it is generously lubricated the gearbox should fit easily over the stem and stem key. Inside the gear housing there is a slot that fits the assembled stem and stem key. You need to ensure proper alignment of the slot in the gear housing with the stem and stem key. The travel stops may need to be loosened and the wheel turned in order to properly align the bolt-holes in the bottom of the gear housing with the bolt-holes through the mounting pad.

Next, insert the other four (4) bolts through the bottom of the mounting pad and thread them into the bottom of the gearbox, also threading in the four (4) bolts that were inserted into the mounting pad at an earlier stage. Next, add the washers and nuts to the bolts and tighten them down. Once you have installed the handwheel be sure to operate the valve one full cycle and adjust the travel stops accordingly to the open and closed positions. This means turning the handwheel to go from its fully open position to fully closed position, adjust the travel stop for the closed position. Then turn the handwheel back the other way to go from its fully closed position to fully open position, adjust the travel stop for the open position.

 

Check out our video on youtube as we show you how to install a gearbox by our valve experts. Contact us with any questions 281-463-1474 or Info@gvcintl.com 

 

Source: Global Valve and Controls, Houston TX

1, 2 or 3 piece Flanged Ball Valves

Flanged Ball Valves

In the world of valves there is always so many to choose from. Flanged ball valves, Threaded ball valves and the list goes on! Other things you must know when calling in for a quote is the size, trim, material, reduced or full port of the valve and most importantly what the valve will be used for. When you have finally decided that you need a flanged ball valve for your application, you will need to decide if you will want a 1, 2 or 3 piece valve. You will make a decision based on cost, maintenance and if it will need to be automated.

First, lets take a look at a one piece flanged ball valve. Contrary to what others say, a 1 piece design ball valve or unibodies are not always the cheapest and you can automate any flanged ball valve with a mounting pad. These valves are not repairable so if one breaks you will need to replace the whole valve which is time and money. If you are looking into a 1 piece flanged ball valve, be sure to check out our Series FS or http://gvcintl.com/files/GVC%20Series%20FS.2011.pdf

A 2 piece and a 3 piece ball valve was definitely designed with maintenance in mind as it can be easily cleaned. The biggest difference between the two is that the 3 piece can be taken out of line without affecting the two end caps while the 2 piece can not. As far as cost, a 3 piece is more expensive up front but in the long run it could be a wiser choice as the seats and seals are replaceable and with a 2 piece you will need to replace the valve entirely if there are any issues. If you are looking for a 2 piece flanged ball valve, take a look at our Series CFS, FS600, or

http://gvcintl.com/files/GVC_Series_CFS.pdf

http://gvcintl.com/files/GVC_Series_FS600.pdf

If you are looking for a 3 piece or a 3 piece in Trunnion take a look at http://gvcintl.com/files/000%20GVC%20SERIES%202T-3T%20Secured%20o.pdf

Source: Valve MD For more information on valves please visit our catalog page here: http://gvcintl.com/catalog.html

Flanged Ball Valves 2" and 3" ANSI 600

Flanged Ball Valves 2″ and 3″ ANSI 600

 

Keeping your valves in check

Purchasing valves can be a major headache for some. For starters, one must know what kind of valve they are in need of and whether or not it fits their application. The following questions should be asked in order to find the proper valve;

–          What is the media?

–          What is the temperature?

–          What is the pressure?

–          Is it an open or closed position?

From there, the manufacturer will have a better idea of what the end user is really looking for. Many times, the manufacturer will find an error and will need more information to provide the best valve.

Once the valve is picked up and has landed in the end users hands, maintaining the valve is the next step. Many people think that once a valve has arrived it is placed in line right away, but this is not the case. Many steps are taken to insure the end user has received the order as they will have many shipments in one day. Step such as;

–          Ensure the valve, actuation and valve control accessories bill of materials matches the end user’s specification sheet.

–          The exterior of the valve and components checked to make sure it was not damaged in transportation

–          Ensure the valve process connections are covered (See article for more details)

Once the valve is “in line”, “stroking the valves and applying general-purpose lubrication at least once a month provides longer-term benefits in the functioning of in line valves”.

The incidence of leaking valves immediately following installation occurs too often, with the blame placed on the valve and its manufacture instead of the end user’s misapplication.” Making sure to follow policy and procedure and taking preventative steps will help get the right valve for the right job without any problems.

Read more at: http://www.pumpsandsystems.com/valves/july-2016-follow-these-tips-extend-life-your-valves

 

trunnion-ball-valves

24: ANSI 150 Trunnion Ball Valves (GVC)

API 6D Valves in line (GVC)

API 6D Valves in line (GVC)

 

Global Valve and Controls Series CFS

Let’s take a look at the  CFS valves. What are they? What are they used for? What sizes are available, materials, I promise all your questions will be answered right here, and if they are not, well now you know who to contact.

The CFS is one of our widely used ball valves; it is used in a wide variety of industries such as oil/gas, petrochemical , pulp and paper , skid package equipment. If you are wondering what is so special about this particular valve. I would say it is considered a high quality, low maintenance ball valve and the price is very competitive compared to other brands. Take a look at some quick facts:

  • Sizes 2″ – 12″ ANSI Class 150-300
  • 2-Piece Body Floating Flanged Design, Full, or Reduced Port
  • Raised Face and Ring Type Joint Ends (RTJ)
  • Self-cleaning, Leak Tight Slotted Seat Design
  • NACE MR0175 Approved
  • Design and Tested to API 6D
  • Fire Tested according to API 607 Standards
  • Floating Ball Design prevents Cavity Pressure Build-up while the Valve is open
  • Wide Variety of Exotic Alloys for Body and Trim
  • Wide Choice of Seat Material (TFM Standard)

Flanged Ball Valves

 

Facts about Threaded End Ball Valves

The valve has many components that you can choose from when ordering, thus it is always important to know the media or application the valve will be used in. Knowing what end connections you need is very crucial. Not all applications can accommodate.

GVC offers:

  • Raised Face (Flanged) Connections
  • Ring Type Joint (Flanged) Connections
  • Threaded Ends
  • Socket Weld Ends
  • Occasionally Butt Weld (Not Standard Production End Connection)

Fact: Did you know that Flanged End Connections are known for being easy to apply to your project?

You may wonder what the difference is between Flanged and Threaded Ends. Flanged Valves feature more bolts, resulting in less tightening, in contrast to Threaded End Connections which need more tightening. Flanged Ends overall can be used for any type of Valve, i.e. Gate, Globe, Ball, or Check. When you have a Threaded End, ultimately you will be working with a Low Pressure type situation. GVC offers Valves with Threaded End connections and can be modified to Socket Weld or Socket Weld x Threaded if need be.

Socket Weld End Connections are commonly used on Stainless Steel or Carbon Steel Valves. When you have a higher temperature and pressure rating you would want to turn to the SW Connection. GVC offers SW Ends and features their leak free seal.

Last but not least, the RTJ and Butt Weld End Connections: GVC stocks majority RTJ End Valves opposed to Butt Weld End Valves. Butt weld end valves are applied to most applications where a higher grade of steel, temperature and pressure is needed. An Engineer from an article I found states, “RTJ Valves have grooves cut into their faces in which they obtain steel Ring Gaskets. They seal when tightened bolts compress the gasket between the Flanges into the grooves, deforming the gasket to make contact inside the grooves, thus creating a metal to metal seal.” Each valve end is beveled to match with the thickness and bevel on the pipe.

Can you guess what the end connections in the picture are?

Double Block and Bleed Valve

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20 RP VS 20 FP

Have you ever wondered what the difference of a 20 Reduced Port Ball Valve and a 20 Full Port Ball Valve?What do you think the differences are after reviewing the chart above?

Observers below:

–   Operations Director states, “Well the cost is a big one, however, the CV Factor changes. Although, the port also changes, but a Reduced Port constricts the flow while the Full Port allows the flow to just flow.”

–   Vice President of Sales & Marketing states, “One is full port and the other is reduced; however, a full port sizes go up to ¾”

–   Account Executive-Inside Sales Account Manager states, “One is full port and the other is standard port, however 20RP’s are considered full port up to ¾” (Water, Oil & Gas Applications. And 20FP’s are a seal welded design.”

–   Account Executive-Inside Sales Account Manager states, “20 RP’s are considered full port up to 3/4”

 

The actual differences are: The CV Factor, how one port functions as compared to the other port, Full Port are a Seal Welded Design, Weight, Length, as well as Height

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