Global Valve and Controls
29Mar/17Off

Fracking in the Permian Basin

Fracking in the Permian Basin

 

The Permian Basin is found in a large part of West Texas as well as Southeast of New Mexico. It was named Permian because it has one of the worlds thickest deposits of rocks Permian geologic period. The Permian Basin is actually composed of three basins which include the Midland Basin, Delaware Basin and the Marfa Basin. Many people do not know but the Permian Basin is the largest petroleum producing basins in America. To get an idea of how large this basin really is, currently, nearly 2 million barrels of oil a day are being pumped from the basin, which still contains an estimated 43 billion barrels of oil and 18 trillion cu ft. of gas.

Companies working in the Permian face two challenges when it comes to water: getting enough water for fracking and getting rid of underground water released by fracking. Water injection is part of the fracking process and currently there are disputes on what needs to be done with the wastewater. Water is beneficial to fracking, by sending a mixture of water, sand and certain additives into a deep-rock formation at high pressure. Soon after the fracturing occurs, water returns to the surface as “flowback” or wastewater. 

What they used to do what inject the water back into the ground, but there are studies that show this has actually been linked to earthquakes. Oklahoma is a prime example, because of this Oklahoma has limited wastewater injections.

Water poses problems for the energy industry in the Permian

 

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