Keeping your valves in check

Purchasing valves can be a major headache for some. For starters, one must know what kind of valve they are in need of and whether or not it fits their application. The following questions should be asked in order to find the proper valve;

–          What is the media?

–          What is the temperature?

–          What is the pressure?

–          Is it an open or closed position?

From there, the manufacturer will have a better idea of what the end user is really looking for. Many times, the manufacturer will find an error and will need more information to provide the best valve.

Once the valve is picked up and has landed in the end users hands, maintaining the valve is the next step. Many people think that once a valve has arrived it is placed in line right away, but this is not the case. Many steps are taken to insure the end user has received the order as they will have many shipments in one day. Step such as;

–          Ensure the valve, actuation and valve control accessories bill of materials matches the end user’s specification sheet.

–          The exterior of the valve and components checked to make sure it was not damaged in transportation

–          Ensure the valve process connections are covered (See article for more details)

Once the valve is “in line”, “stroking the valves and applying general-purpose lubrication at least once a month provides longer-term benefits in the functioning of in line valves”.

The incidence of leaking valves immediately following installation occurs too often, with the blame placed on the valve and its manufacture instead of the end user’s misapplication.” Making sure to follow policy and procedure and taking preventative steps will help get the right valve for the right job without any problems.

Read more at: http://www.pumpsandsystems.com/valves/july-2016-follow-these-tips-extend-life-your-valves

 

trunnion-ball-valves
24: ANSI 150 Trunnion Ball Valves (GVC)
API 6D Valves in line (GVC)
API 6D Valves in line (GVC)