Global Valve and Controls
27Sep/11Off

Pipeline Information and Facts

How does the PNGTS Pipeline work?

Natural gas travels from producing regions in Canada to PNGTS's consumers through its high capacity pipeline. During transportation and storage, natural gas is compressed to save space. Current pipelines have the ability to compress natural gas to nearly 1,500 psi, but PNGTS operates closer to 1,100 psi. The PNGTS pipeline is made of high-strength welded steel and is designed to operate safely at pressures up to 1,440 psi. The pipe was tested at even higher pressure levels before being placed into commercial operation. However, because the gas is under high pressure, it is very important to protect the pipe from accidental scrapes and gouges through the use of the DigSafe system as well as periodic patrols of the right of way by PNGTS field personnel.

 

How long does a pipeline last?

A properly installed, well-maintained pipeline can operate safely and efficiently for decades. The pipeline has been coated and protected against corrosion, and all welds have been x-rayed during construction. In addition, PNGTS regularly inspects the system for damage or deterioration. Sections of pipe can be removed and replaced, if necessary.

 

 

 

How are Gas Pipelines Regulated?

As an interstate natural gas pipeline, PNGTS is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Under the Natural Gas Act of 1938, FERC regulates both the construction of pipeline facilities and the transportation of natural gas in interstate commerce. In addition, FERC also regulates the transportation of natural gas as authorized by The Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (one of the first efforts to deregulate the gas industry). Pipelines must also comply with stringent safety regulations administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Of all transportation industries regulated by the DOT, including those utilizing highways, railroads, and air routes, the natural gas transportation industry has the best safety record.

 

 

What can cause a pipeline accident?

The vast majority of pipeline accidents in the United States are caused by third-party damage, typically when someone excavates too close to the pipeline without proper notification to the pipeline operator or DigSafe. Fortunately, this type of damage is preventable - through the cooperation of our landowners and contractors working along the right-of-way. Other factors that can cause a pipeline accident include construction material defects, internal pipe corrosion, external pipe corrosion, and natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, and landslides. To increase safety and reduce the potential for a pipeline accident, PNGTS was designed and built with the following features:

-High grade materials standard in the industry

-Fusion bond coating of external pipe areas

-A cathodic protection system

 

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.pngts.com/safety.html#life

27Sep/11Off

Oil & Gas Industry BOOMING for Recent College Grads

 

“College graduates are a hot commodity in the oil and gas industry. As demand for oil and gas continues to rise, the industry looks to the next generation of geoscientists and engineers to solve the energy issues of tomorrow. Through advanced internship programs, concentrated college recruitment campaigns, extensive training curricula and open-communication mentoring, oil and gas companies are ensuring the future of the industry.

There are a number of reasons why the need is so great for new talent in the oil and gas industry.”

 

. As mentioned in the article (http://www.oilgrads.com/artRecruitNextGen.asp) Majority of all the baby boomers are occupying all the top job spots in this industry and while they are getting older and ready to retire, the young generation needs to be getting trained to fill their position once they are gone.

 

Many companies will recruit students by giving them an internship as well as educating them about the company. In this article they discuss how companies will participate in School College Fairs, where it is easier for the students to come and find out more information about the company. Companies also offer volunteer work, where one may do physical work such as drilling or general office admin. Both ways are great learning opportunities for the students.

“Many companies have developed intricate internship programs, hiring directly out of these pools of students after they graduate”

27Sep/11Off

TYPES OF STAINLESS STEEL FOR BREWING

Stainless Ball Valves

“Stainless steel is an alloy steel with a bright, long-lasting, silvery finish. The alloy has a 11-26% chromium base, with various percentages of nickel added to increase toughness and titanium added to increase weld ability.

Those most common to brewing are 304 and 316 stainless steel. Kegs are usually made from these materials. Both 304 and 316 have very good corrosion-resistance properties and are easily welded.”

Global Valve and Controls provide valves and controls provide highly capable and reliable service in catalyst slurry, gasification, hot gases, high pressure steam, polyethylene, vinyl chloride and many other related applications. GVC valves in exotic materials, including titanium, alloy 20, Monel and Hastelloy are used for highly corrosive applications involving sulfuric acid, aortic anhydride, and others.

We offer valves in Carbon Steel, Alloy 20, 316SS, CF8M, 304SS, LF2 and many more!

 

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/library/backissues/issue2.4/millspaw.html

22Sep/11Off

VENOCO TO BUILD PIPELINE IN CALIFORNIA: APPROVAL!

Venoco Pipeline

Venoco Inc. said Monday that a subsidiary has received final approval to build a pipeline in California.

The Denver energy company said the pipeline will reduce transportation costs from the South Ellwood field and reach more refineries. That will allow the company to realize $5 to $7 more per barrel of oil it produces.

Venoco also said capital spending will range between $200 million and $250 million this year. That amount includes the construction of the pipeline and retaining rigs for various drilling projects.

Venoco’s stock fell 11 cents to $10.59 in morning trading.

19Sep/11Off

Bottling with compressed air

Hybrid industries have to be able to rely on automation at the points when continuous production changes to discrete production. And the pneumatic systems will not let them down: Controlled DFM drives, DNC standard cylinders or ADVU compact cylinders perform their service indefatigably when it comes to gripping bottles or crates, lifting them or transporting them onwards. They can be reliably controlled by compact CPV valve terminals. The pneumatic solutions are to be found in crate sorting systems, palette-loading robots, in bottle washing machines and, it goes without saying, in the bottling systems themselves. In the Innoclean bottle washing machine from KHS, Copac drives of type DLP from Festo are responsible for opening and closing gate valves for supplying the cleaning fluid.

 

 

From process to factory automation: Pneumatic valve terminals and drives are in their element not only in the brewing process, but also in bottling and packaging.

14Sep/11Off

Accidents during Construction

How does the PNGTS Pipeline work?

Natural gas travels from producing regions in Canada to PNGTS's consumers through its high capacity pipeline. During transportation and storage, natural gas is compressed to save space. Current pipelines have the ability to compress natural gas to nearly 1,500 psi, but PNGTS operates closer to 1,100 psi. The PNGTS pipeline is made of high-strength welded steel and is designed to operate safely at pressures up to 1,440 psi. The pipe was tested at even higher pressure levels before being placed into commercial operation. However, because the gas is under high pressure, it is very important to protect the pipe from accidental scrapes and gouges through the use of the DigSafe system as well as periodic patrols of the right of way by PNGTS field personnel.

 

How long does a pipeline last?

A properly installed, well-maintained pipeline can operate safely and efficiently for decades. The pipeline has been coated and protected against corrosion, and all welds have been x-rayed during construction. In addition, PNGTS regularly inspects the system for damage or deterioration. Sections of pipe can be removed and replaced, if necessary.

 

How are Gas Pipelines Regulated?

As an interstate natural gas pipeline, PNGTS is regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Under the Natural Gas Act of 1938, FERC regulates both the construction of pipeline facilities and the transportation of natural gas in interstate commerce. In addition, FERC also regulates the transportation of natural gas as authorized by The Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (one of the first efforts to deregulate the gas industry). Pipelines must also comply with stringent safety regulations administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Of all transportation industries regulated by the DOT, including those utilizing highways, railroads, and air routes, the natural gas transportation industry has the best safety record.

 

What can cause a pipeline accident?

The vast majority of pipeline accidents in the United States are caused by third-party damage, typically when someone excavates too close to the pipeline without proper notification to the pipeline operator or DigSafe. Fortunately, this type of damage is preventable - through the cooperation of our landowners and contractors working along the right-of-way. Other factors that can cause a pipeline accident include construction material defects, internal pipe corrosion, external pipe corrosion, and natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, and landslides. To increase safety and reduce the potential for a pipeline accident, PNGTS was designed and built with the following features:

-High grade materials standard in the industry

-Fusion bond coating of external pipe areas

-A cathodic protection system

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.pngts.com/safety.html#life

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13Sep/11Off

Is Obama Dismantling the Trans-Alaska Pipeline?

The popular conservative website The Daily Caller ran with the sensational headline Thursday entitled "Pipe Down," followed with a photo of the Trans-Alaska pipeline snaking its way right toward the reader. The story led with the following paraphrase of U.S. Rep. Doc Hastings, the feisty Republican who chairs the House Resource Committee:

"The Obama administration is setting the stage for the dismantling of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline and poses the greatest threat to its existence today," so the lede goes.

The pipeline is indeed in danger of running dry. Once it carried more than two million barrels a day. Now its throughput is at about 600,000 barrels a day, and declining about 5 percent a year. If nothing is done to put more oil in the line, that amount is expected to be around 350,000 in 10 years.

Alyeska Pipeline Service Co., the consortium that runs the pipeline, doesn't yet know at what point the pipeline itself will have to shut. But with such low levels of oil running through it, water, ice and wax builds could result in extended shut-downs of the pipeline.

Needless to say, President Obama does not have the power -- neither legally nor politically -- to dismantle much at all these days, to say nothing of an 800-mile tube of steel running through some of Alaska's most inhospitable lands.

But Obama does have some say over oil and gas development on federal lands, and federal waters, oil that would eventually run down the TAPS.

And in this matter, the article says, the president has been more on the side of "'far-left environmentalists' than in preserving a pipeline that carries approximately 10 percent of the nation's daily oil output..."

Surprised? Some are, especially the coalition of environmentalists who have been fighting offshore oil and gas development in Arctic Alaska.

"Anyone who claims that the Obama administration is on the same page as environmental groups is reality-impaired," said Brendan Cummings, senior counsel for the Center for Biological Diversity, the environmental group that's been on the forefront of fighting Arctic oil and gas developments.

"The Obama administration," Cummings continued, "is largely indistinguishable from the Bush administration," on policies related to offshore and onshore federal lands in Alaska.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alaskadispatchcom/obama-alaska-pipeline_b_938624.html